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have the editorial director of india today, and a very big star blasters program, i enjoyed our encounter last year and expects similar feistiness, m.j. akbar. finally, we have paul madison, who is commander of the navy. thank you for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me and i went online to find a chinese event is being held right now. there are no canadians, japanese, americans, on this panel. we don't have any chinese today, but we should have a lot of fun discussing strategy in asia pacific region with china, but i also want to acknowledge that that voice may not be with us today, but that could be giving us room to run. i went to china and visited with the ministry of foreign affairs and i met with their director and the finally said i cannot understand what the grand strategy is. this was about 2004. and i said, what is your grand strategy? and it was how to keep you guys distracted. [laughter] that seems to be shifting. one of the very interesting things, i know this is not a u.s. panel, but just two days ag
, present-day india, the ching dynasty, temporary china, and the tokugawa shogunate in japan. each of these fears had its own way of governing on its own cultural and political approach to commerce, and order. if you fast-forward about 100, 120 years to the 19th century, the world changed dramatically. power had shifted from the west and the south to the north. and by 1815, the end of the napoleonic wars, europe had pulled ahead of the rest of the world. and the industrial revolution and the development of the steam engine and the development of steel and battleships, and the telegraph and underground, the underwater submarine cable enabled europe, not just to be the most powerful place in the world, but to extend its reach globally. and by the end of the 19th century, europe had either colonized or had already de- colonized 90% of the world landmass. and we have been living in the world since 1815 dominated by the west. economically, politically and ideologically. first it was europe, then europe handed over the baton to the united states after pearl harbor, and roughly 1815 until
online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases of champagne and bouquets of flowers from the white house. because on certain readings you could say, you know, he's the guy who got the president reelected. that means, i believe, he has great insight into what obama's second term economic policy will be -- [laughter] and the big question on the agenda which i think certainly already tremendous bearing on u.s., on the u.s. domestic economy and, therefore, u.s.
of was something else. what was going in india at that time was not an islamic buddy in the. one important aspect of that was to raise the issue of authenticity. what was an authentic indian, anti-odds was only the hand experience of india was authentically indian. and what that meant was all the minorities was the largest minority among the minority. were in some way an authentic. i found that very annoying. and so i thought i would take a very small minority, which is a south indian jewish community. and then create an even smaller minority by having somebody from that community mary into a south indian catholic family, thus creating a catholic-a jewish individuals probably a minority of one person in a country of a billion people. and then show that you could actually grow the whole experience of india out of that one person. you know, so that everybody in indian is authentically indian. that's what it wanted to say. and not just any particular devotional group. [applause] >> i mean, the novel came out of that desire to rescue what it was to an indian from the logic of this kind of attack. >>
and regional organizations india has also been cooperating with the troika appears to latin america is very much pursuing its own pacific agenda in many cases. i'll conclude by saying that as michael mentioned, shortly following the u.s. election, china began its 18th party congress in a process of selecting its new leadership, which will be announced just this week. it seems evident or at least the opinion of scholars in the united states and china -- china's leadership transition is unlikely to have much of an effect on china's official foreign policy towards what america is pretty much on autopilot at the moment in based essentially on china's 2008 white paper on latin america and the caribbean and will continue to be based on that document. but this transition could affect other factors that influence china latin america relations. for example, proposed economic transformation china will be attempting to undertake in the next few years. state-owned enterprise operations, urbanization and industrialization plan and so on. said china's domestic developments obvious critical importance to
, an armed supplier, trading partner with india. the russians answer to the f-35 is the t-50 and the russians are selling the t-50 to india. russia doesn't want to renew the 1990cto, the cooperative threat reduction program, an american financed program. they don't trust america anymore saying america shouldn't tell other countries what their moral values should be when newspaper stories prove we're lacking miranda rule values here in the united states. we have a real big problem going on worldwide, and we just have to completely stop and get into peace negotiations and talk about whose trading partners with who. >> the bills were reform, and none of those directly affect foreign policy because, i believe, that we need to clean house and tend to our own problems before we stick our nose into other people's problems, and the only thick that directly affects the war in syria is that you would have to obey the constitution as originally intended and amended and require congress to declare war on any country where we commit troops. >> getting back to the issue of jobs, f-35, and senator sanders t
, for example, and organizations india also has been cooperating peers to latin america is pursuing its own specific to in many cases. i will conclude by saying that as michael mentioned charlie following the u.s. elections, china began its 18th party congress in a process of selecting a smooth leadership, which will be announced just this week. it seems evident or this is the opinion of scholars in the night dates in china that china's leadership transition is unlikely to have much of an effect on china's official for policy towards latin america. it's pretty much on autopilot and based essentially on china's defense in a white paper on latin america and the caribbean and will continue to be based on that document. but the transition could affect other factors that influence china latin america relations. for example, the proposed economic transformation that will be attempting to undertake in the next few years. state owned enterprise operations, urbanization and industrialization plans and so on. so china's domestic developments will be of critical importance to its relations throughout
automobile payment? how would you feed your family? india, and maybe a year they will get 80% of their money back. but what happens during that year? so, i would ctu, please don't get the impression that these people will be made whole. i want to commend my subcommittee chairman, randy neugebauer who is behind me here. i have issued a prepared statement, which i released just a few minutes ago on m. s. -- mf capital. two of them are behind the other than my subcommittee chair. these are superstars in the freshman class. quico canseco from south texas and nan haworth from i guess we will call it the hudson river valley. both of them as freshmen actually pass significant reform legislation. many of you know tranter was valedictorian of her class at princeton. quico's grandparents fled mexico during a revolution, came to america for freedom. he is the american dream. he operated a bank in texas. he has a banking background. they were really loved by republicans and democrats together. nan was actually criticized for being a member of the tea party. believe you me, she may be many things, to lea
by risks associated just with rising sea levels. one is diago garcia, a small island south of india, home to a although gist particular hub -- logistic hub. even absent a storm or tsunami, this installation is threatened by intkaeugs for slow -- inundation of slow staepbd did i sea level rise. the norfolk naval base is home to the u.s. atlantic fleet. a "new york times" analysis this past weekend using u.s. geological survey and noaa data showed a five-foot sea level rise would permanently flood portions of that base. the base is at continuing risk from storm surges. by the way, a five-foot sea level rise is now predicted to be a possibility in this century. eglin air force on florida's gulf coast is threatened by storm surge, sea level rise and salt water infiltration. we know -- we know that climate change loads the dice for more and more severe extreme weather. retired brigadier general steven anderson and retired lieutenant general daniel christman used katrina as an example of how extreme weather can cause negative operational impacts to our military. in response to katrina the natio
with some optimism but a relatively close election. but one thing to note is all the votes are not india, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort o
a resolution of that relationship between pakistan and afghanistan and india, in ways that might reassure pakistan? >> senator, at this point i don't have insight into what our government is doing to try to work very delicate relationship between pakistan and 80. i'm certainly aware that is going to be critical to regional stability in the long-term and our success in afghanistan, and if confirmed i suspect i will be involved in the issue and have an opportunity to provide military advice as it is for the leadership works to the diplomatic piece. >> speak to the announcement that pakistan is going to release several low-level taliban prisoners at the request of the afghan government. do you think it does suggest we could work towards a negotiated settlement, or do you think that there's just really no path to do between afghan government and the taliban without pakistan's? >> senator, i do know that i would actually support any initiative that would bring a political resolution to the conflict in afghanistan, and i know ambassador grossman, our special representative, is working very hard
to be in this new century where we've got rising competition in china and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to be different than presidential lecktorts. and the comments i made were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential election. yo
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12